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Ocicat

The Scratching Post

Ocicat

The Ocicat offers a wild appearance within a domestic cat. The body is long, large and muscular. The head has a modified wedge with a slight curve from the jaw to the cheek. The eyes are large, almond-shaped and come in all colors except blue. The ears are moderately large. The long legs are muscular and in good proportion to the body. The feet are oval and compact. The tail is long, medium-slim and has only a slight taper with a dark tip. The coat is covered with distinctive dark spots similar to the Ocelot.

Temperament The Ocicat is even-tempered and makes a good family cat. They are very active, playful and unusually easy to train. They are intelligent and talkative and make perfect pets for those who love interactive cats. They are loyal and loving and display a deep affection for their human companions. This breed can be taught to use a leash. Ocicats also have a talent for teaching themselves tricks, like opening doors and the lids of containers that contain their favorite cat treats. They will find a way if it is something that they really want.
Weight Male 10-15 lbs.; Female 7-12 lbs.
Health Problems The Ocicat is generally a healthy cat. Minor concerns include renal amyloidosis, PK deficiency and liver amyloidosis.
Living Conditions The Ocicat enjoys playing and exercising outdoors. If a yard is not available, a large house or apartment with a terrace can suffice.
Exercise This breed is active and needs no coaxing to get it to exercise. Provide your cat with ample room to play and run. Make sure you provide a steady supply of interactive toys if it is kept indoors most of the time.
Life Expectancy 15-18 years
Grooming This breed requires very little grooming. Their coat is short, fine and naturally shiny. Brush weekly to remove any dead hairs.
Origin The original Ocicat was unexpectedly bred in the 1960?s in Michigan by Virginia Daly of the Dalai cattery. The first Ocicat resulted from mating a Siamese and Abyssinian. Mrs. Daly was trying to make Aby-pointed Siamese kittens and in the litter was Tonga, the first spotted Ocicat, named because of the close resemblance to the wild Ocelot. Tonga, the first Ocicat, was neutered and sold as a pet. When noted geneticist, Dr. Clyde Keeler, sought to see more domestic cats which would mimic some of the wild species, the breeding process was repeated to produce more Ocicats. Other breeders followed Mrs. Daly?s and Dr. Keeler?s recipe to broaden the Ocicat?s genetic base. It is a common misconception that Ocicats actually descended from the Ocelot itself, but this is entirely untrue.