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Turkish Angora

The Scratching Post

Turkish Angora

The Turkish Angora is a rare and valued treasure in the cat fancy community. They are medium-sized and finely boned. They have a long and slender torso and neck. The small to medium-sized head tapers towards the chin. The large ears are pointed and tufted and the almond-shaped eyes are large. The eye color can be any shade of green, gold, golden-green, copper, blue or odd-eyed. The tail is long and carries a tuff. Once, only cats with white coats and blue eyes were accepted in competition, but today, all varieties and colors are accepted.

Temperament The Turkish Angora is graceful, energetic and usually the first to welcome everyone into the home. This intelligent breed is loving and playful, making them an excellent choice for families with young children. They also make lively companions for senior adults. They get along fine with other cats and cat-friendly dogs, but their assertive nature makes them the dominant pet in the household.
Weight 6-11 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is generally a strong and healthy breed; however, white Turkish Angoras with blue eyes are often deaf. Those with one blue are often deaf on the side with the blue eye.
Living Conditions Turks can live fine in either an apartment or a house. Though they enjoy being outdoors, they do not require it. Make sure they are provided with plenty of toys and a sturdy scratching post indoors.
Exercise This active breed enjoys playing and need lots of room to run.
Life Expectancy 15 or more years
Grooming The Turk only requires weekly brushing and combing.
Origin The Turkish Angora originates from Western Turkey, near Ankara, formerly named Angora. These cats are believed to be descendents of longhair cats brought to Europe by the Vikings in the 10th century. By the 1900's, this breed was used in Persian breeding programs. While the Persians became widely popular, the Turkish Angora almost vanished. In the 1950's, a few of the remaining Turkish Angoras were imported to the United States from the Ankara Zoo, and new breeding programs were begun. The white Turkish Angora was recognized by the CFA 1968 and ten years later, the colored varieties were accepted.