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Cardigan Welsh Corgi

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Cardigan Welsh Corgi

Cardigan Welsh Corgi is a small sized, well-built dog that sits low to the ground. The medium to short double coat is straight, waterproof and has a smooth, dense outer coat. Hair on the coat is short around the ears, head, and front of the legs and long around the ruff, back of the legs and underside of tail. The colors of the coat are usually red, black, blue merle, black/tan, sable/brindle, and black/brindle. Many times the coats have white markings on them. All colors, except all white, are accepted when showing the breed. The broad head has a round, tapered muzzle and the occiput is not emphasized. The jaw is strong and the teeth should meet in a scissor-like bite. The medium sized, wide-set eyes should be blue if the coat is merle and dark if the coat is any other color. The large ears should stand erect and should be slightly rounded at the tips. The muscular neck merges into well-developed shoulders. The broad, deep chest is well-sprung and the topline is straight. The legs are short with the front feet slightly turned out. The round feet should be large. The tail is bushy, "fox-like" and carried over the back.

Temperament Cardigan Welsh Corgi's are loyal, affectionate, obedient, protective and devoted little dogs. They are good with older more considerate children. Due to their strong herding instincts, they may attempt to herd people by nipping at their heels; however, they can be trained to stop this behavior. Cardigan Welsh Corgis are small in size but many of them have lost their lives defending their homes and families. They are generally suspicious of strangers, although Cardigans are more social than the Pembroke variety. They are usually good with non-canine animals and other Corgis, but they can become combative with other dogs. Males are especially aggressive around females in heat.
Height, Weight Height: 10-13" ; Weight: 25-30 lbs.
Health Problems This breed can be prone to glaucoma. They tend to gain weight easily so be careful with treats.
Living Conditions Cardigans will do great with apartment living. They are active indoors and do fine without a yard.
Exercise This breed needs regular exercise.
Life Expectancy About 12-15 years
Grooming The coat of the Cardigan is water resistant and easy to groom. Bathe only when necessary. This breed sheds heavily twice a year.
Origin The origin of the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is still unknown. It is believed that they are either descendants of the Swedish Vallhund, brought to Wales by Vikings in the 800s or that the Cardigan Welsh Corgi is the older variety of Swedish Vallhund, brought to Wales by the Celts in about 1200 BC. However, records have been discovered that state the breed existed in the British Isles during 1200 B.C. They were also mentioned in the Domesday Book written in 1086. The Celtic word for dog is "corgi" and is the speculated origin of the breed's name. This breed was actually developed in Cardiganshire, Wales and was used as cattle drovers, vermin hunters and farm guards. They drove cattle by barking and nipping at the heels of the animal. Their size helps them to move out of the way when herded animals try to kick. The Pembroke and Cardigan varieties of Welsh Corgis were interbred until 1934 when they were recognized as separate breeds. Both breeds are recognized by the AKC and the UKC.
Group AKC and UKC Herding Dog