Dog food, cat food, pet vitamins, pet supplements, and all your pet supplies from the online pet supply leader.

Chinese Shar-Pei

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Chinese Shar-Pei

The Chinese Shar-Pei is also known as the Chinese Wrinkle Dog. There are three coat varieties in this breed: the horse coat, the brush coat and the rare bear coat, which is not recognized by the AKC. Their coat is short, bristly and harsh to the touch. The skull should be flat and broad with a moderate stop. There should be fine wrinkles on the forehead and cheeks and these wrinkles should continue down to form dewlaps. The teeth should be strong with a complete scissor bite. A bluish tongue is preferred. The nose is large and wide and should be black. The eyes are tiny, almond-shaped and deep set. The ears are very tiny and are like no other breed. They are triangle shaped and lie flat against the head. The neck should be short and strong with loose skin underneath. The tail should be rounded and narrow to a point. It is carried high and curves in a tight curl over the back.

Temperament Chinese Shar-Peis are very independent, dominant and strong-willed dogs. Though intelligent and highly responsive, they can be very dog aggressive. They are very loyal to their handler, but do not always follow orders. They should be socialized at a young age. They make good companions and are excellent watchdogs. This breed needs a confident owner. They are very clean dogs and very easy to housebreak. Shar-Peis hate the water and will go out of their way to avoid it. Puppies in this breed grow very quickly and should be fed accordingly. They can tend to slobber especially if they are in pain. Owners should seek a reputable breeder to prevent hereditary skin problems as well as dog aggression.
Height, Weight Height: 18-20" ; Weight: 40-55 lbs.
Health Problems This breed can be prone to hereditary skin problems. This problem can be avoided if the dog is purchased from a reputable breeder. They are also prone to fever and kidney failure.
Living Conditions Chinese Shar-Pei can live fine in an apartment. They are relatively active indoors and do fine without a yard. Keep this breed cool as they don't tolerate the heat very well. Must have shade and water nearby.
Exercise This breed has a need for regular exercise. Keep them on a leash as they can be very dog aggressive. Be careful with this breed in the heat as they can overheat quickly.
Life Expectancy About 10 years
Grooming This breed is easy to groom by brushing regularly. Bathe and brush during the molting season to remove dead hair. Some owners may be allergic to this breed's coat.
Origin The Shar-Pei has existed for centuries in the southern provinces near the South China Sea, with Dah Let, Kwantung Province given as its source. The breed aided the peasants through hunting, herding and protection ? and provided them entertainment through dog fighting. During dog fighting, the loose skin enabled the dog to turn on its opponent even when grasped firmly in their opponent's jaws. They were said to be capable of turning around in their own skin. The tiny ears and deep-set eyes were other qualities used to prevent injuries. Even their short, bristly coat was distasteful in an opponent's mouth. While the Chow Chow was gaining popularity abroad, the Shar-Pei breed was being decimated at home in China. They finally disappeared in mainland China, and only a few remained in Hong Kong. It was during that time that a clever owner, Matgo Law, became concerned that his beloved breed might disappear entirely. He wrote to an all-breed dog magazine, beseeching Americans to become involved with the plight of the Shar-Pei. His mission was successful and brought immediate response. During the 1970s, a few specimens where brought to the US and they were considered the rarest dog in the world. Their unique features quickly made them the darlings of the talk shows. They are recognized by both the AKC and the UKC.
Group AKC Non-Sporting, UKC Northern Breed