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Rottweiler

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Rottweiler

Rottweilers have a double coat, with the medium length outer coat being coarse and the under coat fine. The coat color is black with rust markings on the cheeks, chest, lower legs, tail and above the eyes. The broad head has a well-defined stop, rounded forehead and a well-developed occiput. The almond shaped eyes are dark brown and medium in size. The high set, triangular ears are small, pendant and sit wide on the head. The wide nose should be black. The inside of the mouth and lips should also be black. The teeth should meet in a scissor-like bite. The long neck should be slightly arched merging into well-laid back shoulders. The broad back should have a slightly sloping croup and a level topline. The muscular legs should be straight with well-bent stifles and strong hocks. The round feet should be compact with well-arched toes. The strong tail is customarily docked and slightly carried above horizontal. Rear dewclaws are customarily removed when the tail is docked.

Temperament Rottweiler's are a calm, courageous, serious, and devoted breed. Their temperaments may vary. They can be gregarious, outgoing and carefree while others are aloof, independent and unsociable. This breed is intensely loyal to their families and will defend them to the death. They need an owner who can handle their massive size, but should be kept on a lead in public as they can be dog aggressive. Rottweiler's have a tendency to become jealous if their owner's attention is focused elsewhere. They have proven their worth countless times in police, military and customs work. This breed should be chosen carefully and from a reputable breeder since the breed can be naturally aggressive. Rotties do well in competitive obedience, schutzhund and tracking.
Height, Weight Male Height: 24-27" ; Weight: 95-130 lbs.
Female Height: 22-25" ; Weight: 85-115 lbs.
Health Problems Rotties are prone to hip dysplasia, ACL damage and entropion. They tend to snore and to overeat.
Living Conditions Rottweiler's will do fine living in an apartment if they are sufficiently exercised. They do best with a small to an average-sized yard.
Exercise This breed needs plenty of exercise. They cannot get too much exercise since it is what they thrive on. They love to chase balls and run free but they are not wanderers. They love to swim and make perfect bicycling companions.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming The smooth, glossy coat of this breed is easy to care for. Brush or comb weekly to remove dead hair and only bathe when necessary. This breed is an average shedder.
Origin Although their history is unclear, the Rottweiler was thought to be a descendant of mastiffs and to have been in existence since the early Roman Era. During this time, they were supposedly used by the legions throughout their campaigns over the Alps and into Europe. These dogs would hunt for wild boar as well as drive and guard the livestock. If records can be found confirming this theory, then the Rottweiler would have connections to the Swiss Mountain Dogs and the Entelbuchers. During the Middle Ages, the Rottweiler was crossed with local sheepdogs in the town of Rottweil. This dog was named Rottweiler Metzgerhund or the Rottweil Butcher's Dog. They would assist butchers by driving cattle from town to town. Cattle driving became illegal in Germany during the 19th century and the Rottweiler suffered a decline in the popularity. In 1914, Rottweilers would be used for their physical strength and intelligence during the first World War. The breed was eventually imported to the United States during the 1930s. Rottweilers were recognized as a standardized breed by the AKC in 1935, by the British Kennel Club in 1936 and by the United Kennel Club in 1950. Today, this breed is used as police and guard dogs.
Group AKC Working, UKC Guardian Dog