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Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Soft Coated Wheaten Terrier

The Wheaten Terrier is a medium-sized square dog. The head is shaped like a triangle and long. The muzzle is short with jaws that grip prey well. The ears are v-shaped and fold forward. The teeth should form a scissor or level bite. The eyes are normally hazel or dark brown. Light eye color is considered a fault. The nose is large and black and the topline is level. Dewclaws should be removed. The round feet carry dark nails. The tail is docked and is carried upright. Puppies are born black but lighten as the dog gets older.

Temperament The Wheaten Terrier is alert, happy, playful and friendly. Though they do not bark unnecessarily, they will give voice when a stranger arrives. They make great watchdogs. They get along well with children and other dogs, as long as they are socialized at an early age. They should not live with cats as any quick movement will signal an attack. He is sweet-tempered and maintains his puppy attitude throughout his lifetime. The Wheaten Terrier bonds very closely with their family. Males in the breed may become combative with other male dogs if challenged. This breed is increasing in popularity in the United States.
Height, Weight Male Height: 18-20" ; Weight: 35-45 lbs.
Female Height: 17-19" ; Weight: 30-40 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is prone to flea allergies, PLE and PLN.
Living Conditions Wheaten Terriers will do great living in an apartment and do fine with a small yard. They prefer cooler temperatures.
Exercise This breed needs a moderate amount of regular exercise.
Life Expectancy About 12-15 years
Grooming This breed's coat is made to look natural. Do not use a brush as it will make the coat look fluffy. Comb with a medium-toothed comb to keep it free of tangles. Begin your grooming regiment while he is still a puppy. Check eyes and ears often. A well-groomed dog will not shed much hair. They are good for allergy sufferers.
Origin The Wheaten Terrier of 200 years ago was a dog of the poor, and was so common that few considered it worthy of notice. He had no wealthy aristocrats to foster him and was only recognized as a separate breed when the Wheaten was issued its present name in 1937. Around that time, a group of fanciers wanted to save this historic Irish breed. Although the Wheaten is a very old breed, it is a latecomer to the modern world of purebred dogs. AKC approval did not come until 1973. Recognition from the UKC came in 1978.
Group AKC and UKC Terrier