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Bouvier des Ardennes

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Bouvier des Ardennes

In the past, all dogs working with cattle were given the name bouvier (bovine herdsman), and each region had its own type. The Bouvier des Ardennes is a rough-coated working class dog. The head is relatively short with a short and broad muzzle and a goat-like beard. The uncropped ears are erect and break forward. The eyes are dark in color. They have a short and thick neck with a broad and deep chest. The topline is powerful and horizontal. This breed can be naturally tailless or it can be docked to one vertebra. The rough and mussed coat is shorter on the head and legs and has a thick undercoat. All colors are permitted.

Temperament The Bouvier des Ardennes is a tough, hard-working dog. They are accustomed to living outdoors and herding cattle. The Ardennes is playful, curious, agile and sociable. Its main quality is it adaptability. They are always on the alert and are wary of strangers. This breed is obstinate and extremely courageous when it comes to defending its people, its belongings and its territory. They are affectionate with their owners and are very obedient.
Height, Weight Height: up to 24" or more ; Weight: up to 55 lbs.
Health Problems There are no known health concerns with this breed.
Living Conditions The Bouvier de Ardennes is not made for city living. They need lots of space to run.
Exercise This breed needs lots of daily exercise and space to run.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming Regular brushing is required.
Origin Some believe that the Ardennes was created using the Belgian Cattle Dog and the Picardy Shepherd. Others believe that they are a native breed, developed around the 18th century by crossing several local sheepdog breeds. But however they came to be; they have always been called the cow dog in the Belgian Ardennes and selected for their herding abilities. This breed works perfectly in the harsh climate and difficult terrain of the region they serve. They are recognized by the FCI and the UKC.
Group Herding