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Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Czechoslovakian Wolfdog

The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog is also known as the Czech Wolfdog. They are tall, light and strong. The head is cone-shaped with a lightly domed forehead and a moderate stop. The eyes are narrow and are amber in color. The ears are held erect and are narrow, short and triangular-shaped. The neck is muscular and the chest is full. The tail is set high, is bushy and hangs down when at rest and sickle when in action. The coat of this unique breed is straight and close-lying. There is an abundant undercoat during the winter. Coat colors include wolf coloring or silver-gray with a light mask.

Temperament The Czech Wolfdog is intelligent, lively, active and quick. This breed is fearless, courageous and maintains a pleasant sounding howl. They bond strongly with their family including family pets, but strangers should beware. Encounters with strange animals may result in a confrontation. Czech Wolfdogs have an intense instinct to hunt when they are pups; however, this should be discouraged in order to prevent an aggressive adult. Adolescent puppies tend to be a handful, but females are generally easy to control. This breed is extremely good at trailing a scent. They have a low tendency to bark, which makes them poor watchdogs.
Height, Weight Height: 24-30" ; Weight: 44-77 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is usually very hardy, but may occasionally suffer from hip dysplasia.
Living Conditions The Czechoslovakian Wolfdog needs lots of space to exercise. They need an experienced and firm owner who lives in a rural area. They do not get along well with other neighboring dogs.
Exercise This breed has a lot of energy that needs to be expelled with exercise.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming This breed is easy to groom with occasional brushing.
Origin The Czech Wolfdog originated in the former Czechoslovakian Republic in 1955. During an experiment, the Carpathian Timberwolf was crossed with the German Shepherd and the Wolfdog was created. Though steps were taken to create a dog with the best traits of both breeds, the experiment was not a total success. Some Wolfdogs today still exhibit some of the undesired traits of the wolf, including shyness, training difficulties and aggression towards strange animals. The breed is recognized by the FCI, the UKC and has been accepted for recording in the AKC Foundation Stock Service®.
Group AKC/FSS Herding, UKC Herding Dog