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German Spitz

The Canine Chronicles Directory

German Spitz

There are five different types of the German Spitz: the Keeshond (considered a separate breed), the Giant Spitz, the Standard Spitz, the Toy Spitz and the Dwarf/Midget Spitz also known as the Pomeranian (considered a separate breed). The German Spitz has a weather resistant, double coat. The long outercoat is course and the dense undercoat is downy. The hair on the outercoat stands away from the body. The Giant Spitz? coat is usually solid colored including black, white or brown. The Standard can be solid as well and also include orange or wolf gray. Toys are all solid colors. The wedge-shaped head has a definite stop. The triangular ears stand erect and the slanted eyes are chestnut in color. The black lips have a scissor-like bite. They also have a fox-like smile. They have round, compact feet with arched toes. Their plumed tail is medium in length and curls over the back.

Temperament German Spitz are happy, refined and confident. They are described as being child-like as they are anxious to please but still trying to get what they want. They can be a bit wary of strangers and strange dogs. This willful breed can sometimes be temperamental. They love to jump and stand on their hind legs to get your attention or to just show off. They are known to be excessive barkers and need early training to prevent this from becoming a problem. This breed needs an owner that will let them know who is boss. They are not recommended for young children; however, they get along great with older, more considerate children. They make excellent companions for the elderly. Beautiful and elegant in the show ring, they can be a bit difficult to train.
Height, Weight Giant Height: 16-17" ; Weight: 38.5-40 lbs.
Standard Height: 11.5-15" ; Weight: 23-35 lbs.
Toy Height: 9-11"; Weight: 18-22 lbs.
Health Problems German Spitz are prone to dental problems, luxating patellas, patent ductus arteriosus (congenital heart defect), PRA (Progressive Retinal Artrophy), and tracheal collapse.
Living Conditions The German Spitz will do okay living in an apartment if they receive sufficient exercise. If they are kept in an apartment, they should be taught not to bark excessively. They do well with city living.
Exercise This breed has a great need for exercise. They would love either a 10 mile hike or a one mile walk.
Life Expectancy About 12-15 years
Grooming This breed should be brushed or combed daily to keep the coat looking full, beautiful and to prevent matting. Some in this breed do not like to be groomed, so begin when they are puppies. This breed is a heavy shedder twice a year.
Origin The German Spitz has been around since 1450. The Spitz breed is probably descended from dogs brought to Germany, Holland or Scandinavia by the Vikings who plundered and purged the cities during the Renaissance era. The German Spitz is one of the oldest breeds of dogs in Central Europe. The German Spitz was brought to America and over time, was introduced as the American Eskimo Dog because of the widespread anti-German feeling during World War II. They are recognized by the UKC and have been accepted for recording in the AKC Foundation Stock Service®.
Group AKC/FSS Working, UKC Northern