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Black Russian Terrier

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Black Russian Terrier

Black Russian Terriers are a rare breed with a robust, heavy-boned build. They have a water resistant, ruffled double coat consisting of a coarse outer coat and a soft, thick undercoat. The coat should always be black with the exception of a few gray hairs. White or brown markings are unacceptable when showing the dog. The Black Russian Terriers head should be square shaped with a broad skull and a definite stop. The muzzle is slightly shorter than the skull. The medium almond shaped eyes are usually dark and wide set, rimmed with black. The triangular ears are small and fold along the face. Cropped ears are not acceptable when showing this breed. The nose is large and black. The black lips should be full, with no flews, the gums dark and the tongue may have a black mark. The teeth should meet in a scissor-like bite. The neck should be thick and muscular without a large dewlap. It should merge into large muscular shoulders. The top line should be level. The withers rise over the backline and the croup is lightly descending to a high set tail. The legs should be parallel to each other, the forelegs straight and well-boned and the hindquarters well-boned, muscular with a high degree of angulation. The hocks are large and developed for flexibility and drive. The bear paw-like feet have tough, black, thick pads. The nails are also large and dark. Rear dewclaws must be removed. The high-set tail should be docked.

Temperament Black Russian Terriers are brave, self-confident, stable and keenly observant. They try to provide both physical and emotional support to their owners. This breed matures slowly and the protective instincts will not emerge until they are one or two years old. Once they are fully matured, they are excellent guard dogs and will protect their family, home, farm, etc. This is a very observant breed and their reaction to strangers will reflect those of their owners. Black Russian Terriers do not bark unless it is necessary. They should not be left unsupervised around children. They have a tendency to protect the family children from children who are unknown to the dog. They also will try to herd the children. Males love children; although females are more apt to play with them. Black Russian Terriers make great farm dogs due to their attentive nature, their tendency to stay within their territory and their gentility with farm animals. This breed needs to be a part of their family's lives. If left alone for excessive periods of time, they can become aggressive and destructive. Male Black Russian Terriers cannot live with other male dogs, however, they can easily live with non-dominant or small dogs, cats, horses, rabbits, etc.
Height, Weight Male Height: 25-29" ; Weight: 80-143 lbs.
Female Height: 25-28" ; Weight: 80-143 lbs.
Health Problems This breed can be prone hip dysplasia. Care should be taken with the ears to prevent otitis.
Living Conditions Black Russian Terriers can live fine in an apartment. No matter how large your yard is, you will always find them sitting at the front door waiting to come in. They need extensive human contact to be happy and will follow you from room to room. This breed does not do well in a kennel.
Exercise This breed loves to go for a walk. They also love the water and snow.
Life Expectancy About 10-11 years
Grooming The BRT needs to be brushed about once a week and professionally trimmed 2-3 times a year. Hair should be regularly removed from the ear ducts and from between the toes. They are not heavy shedders.
Origin The Black Russian Terrier was developed by the Russian Military in the 1950s. They wanted to create a "Superman-stopper", but they needed a breed that would be hard working, loyal and able to withstand the extreme Russian winters. Giant Schnauzer-Airedale crosses were selectively bred with Airedale-Rottweiler crosses and Giant Schnauzer-Rottweiler crosses. The Russian Water Dog was used along with 17 other breeds, resulting in the creation of the Black Russian Terrier. In 1957, this new breed was exhibited at a large all-Russian Dog show where it peaked the interest of private breeders and the Russian "DOSAAF" Breeders (DOSAAF is a paramilitary organization). They purchased the dog from the Red Star kennels and began to develop traits that helped the Black Russian Terrier become milder in temperament. The FCI standard for this breed was recorded in 1983. They were first exhibited in the United States in 1991, were recognized by the UKC in 1995 and by the AKC in 2004.
Group AKC Working, UKC Guardian Dog