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Glen of Imaal Terrier

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Glen of Imaal Terrier

The Glen of Imaal Terrier is low-stationed with slightly bowed front legs to give a mechanical advantage while digging. The harsh coat is weather-resistant. It resembles the Welsh Corgi. The shaggy medium-length coat comes in several colors, including blue, red, brindle or wheaten. The outer layer of the coat is rough but the undercoat is soft. The chest is strong and broad. The head has a distinct stop and the muzzle is tapered and round. The ears are half-rose shaped. This breed has round, chestnut eyes and the teeth should meet in a level or scissor bite. The tail is docked to about half its length and should be about a handhold size.

Temperament Because the "no barking" rule was absolute in trials, this terrier makes a quiet companion. They are tough, stoic and spirited when hunting, but otherwise, very docile. Glens can be adoring with their family and many live happily with children, but this terrier is not to be confused with the patient Golden Retriever. They respond well to obedience training and like to be near their owner. They are feisty with other animals and, like most terriers, can be dog aggressive. Some Glens can live well with cats, but with vigilant training. This breed likes to dig and chase.
Height, Weight Height: 14" ; Weight: 34-36 lbs.
Health Problems The Glen of Imaal Terrier is a hardy breed that has few known diseases. The most common are hip dysplasia, atopic dermatitis and progressive retinal atrophy.
Living Conditions The Glen will do fine with apartment living if given regular exercise. They will do fine without a yard. They can sleep outdoors but would rather be inside with their owners.
Exercise This breed loves to run and play but will take any exercise that its owner can give.
Life Expectancy About 13-14 years
Grooming The Glen is easy to groom. It needs to be stripped twice a year. Scissor clip under the tail when needed. Pluck hair from out of the ears and trim hair on the feet. Show dogs need more grooming. This breed sheds little or no hair.
Origin Irish folklore says that the Glen Terrier was the result of a cross between the great Celtic hounds and a mongoose, and that the offspring was saved from culling by St. Patrick. The yarn continues that the Firbolgs, half snake and half human, ate all the Irish babies and puppies in the land. Upon Patrick's return to Ireland, Glens assisted St. Patrick in ridding Ireland of the snake people and the snakes. The breed was recognized formally as recently as the 1930s. In the 1950s, Paddy Brennan and Willie Kane, both admirers of the breed, made a concerted effort to build its reputation and numbers. The Glen was bred to rid the home and farm of vermin and to hunt badger and fox. Their small size made it easy for them to go into a badger's den and attack. They are recognized by the AKC and the UKC.
Group AKC and UKC Terrier