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Gordon Setter

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Gordon Setter

The Gordon Setter is the heaviest headed of the setters with long, low-set ears. It is the only black and tan setter with a lovely feathered coat. The head is long, chiseled and massive, with a very pronounced stop with a black nose and large nostrils. The long muzzle is square, not pointed, and should be approximately the same length from nose to stop as the skull from stop to occiput. The teeth may meet in a scissor or level bite, but a scissor bite is preferred. The long, slightly pointed ears hang flat beside that head. The oval eyes are dark brown. The topline slopes gently downward from the withers. The deep chest should reach to the elbows, but should not be too broad. The well-feathered tail is thick at the root, tapering to a fine point. The front legs should be large-boned and straight. The feet should be cat-like, with arched toes and well furnished with hair. Dewclaws may be removed. The soft, glossy coat may be straight or slightly wavy, with profuse feathering on the legs, underside, ears and tail. The tail feathering should create a triangular silhouette, with the hair gradually growing shorter as the tail tapers. The color should always be black with the location of the marking clearly specified in the official standard.

Temperament Gordon Setters are gentle, loyal and sensitive and make wonderful family pets if they are allowed to have plenty of exercise. They are excellent with children but without enough exercise, they can become rather hyperactive and may inadvertently knock over small children. They may take a moment to get used to strangers. This breed can be a bit headstrong, but early training can prevent this bad habit. They need a consistent and loving handler.
Height, Weight Male Height: 24-27" ; Weight: 55-80 lbs.
Female Height: 23-26" ; Weight: 45-70 lbs.
Health Problems This breed can gain weight easily so be careful not to overfeed. They are prone to hip dysplasia and eye diseases.
Living Conditions Gordon Setters should not live in an apartment. They do better with an average size yard and are much calmer indoors if they get enough activity outdoors. A good fenced-in yard is wonderful for this breed so that they can roam and run free.
Exercise This breed needs plenty of daily vigorous exercise. They can become difficult to manage if they don't get enough exercise.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming This breed is easy to groom with regular brushing. Check the coat often for burrs and tangles and check for matting. Bathe only when necessary. Trim the pads and clip the toenails often. They are average shedders.
Origin Black and fallow setting dogs have been known in Scotland for at least 350 years. They sprang from setting spaniels. These were crossed with local dogs to create a type for Scottish hunting conditions. In the 18th century, the present name was adapted because of the famed dogs kept by the Duke of Gordon. Early kennels had black/whites, tricolors and reds as well as the black/tan, but the black/tan color soon became the most desired ? thus the mark of purity. Because of their handsome looks as well as their field abilities, they were imported and welcomed into America in the mid 1800s. Their lack of breakneck speed and breathtaking style to compete with the English Setter and pointer at the big Circuit Trials may have been their rescue from the breed split seen in other gun dogs.
Group Sporting