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Great Pyrenees

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Great Pyrenees

The Great Pyrenees, also known as the Pyrenean Mountain Dog, is a strong, muscular and large dog. It has dark eyes, a black nose and dark coloring around the mouth. It looks a lot like a brown bear except for the coloring. Coat colors are solid white, or white with patches of tan, wolf-gray or pale yellow. Prys have a thick weather-resistant double coat that can either be straight or slightly wavy. The body proportions are rectangular and the topline is level. They have a broad chest and the head is wedge-shaped with a slightly round skull. The teeth should meet in a scissor-like bite; however a level bite is allowed. The medium sized ears are pendant and triangular. The muzzle is slightly pointed and wide. The tail is long, feathered and plumed and curves upward slightly at the tip.

Temperament The Great Pyrenees is a devoted guardian of the family. It is very wary of strangers be them human or animal. It is calm and well-mannered when not provoked. He is courageous, loyal, obedient, gentle and affectionate with those he loves. He can be somewhat independent and stubborn in nature. This breed needs a dominant and secure owner. Great patience is needed when training this breed. They reach maturity at two years of age and some tend to drool and slobber.
Height, Weight Male Height: 27-32" ; Weight: Up to 100 lbs.
Female Height: 25-29" ; Weight: Up to 85 lbs.
Health Problems The most common health concern in Great Pyrenees' is hip dysplasia. They can be prone to skin problems in hot weather.
Living Conditions Pyrs should not live in an apartment. This breed needs lots of space. They are not very active indoors and do better with regular exercise and an average-sized yard. Very young Pyrs may run off. They do better in cooler climates. This breed's thick double coat allows it to live outdoors year round in very harsh climates.
Exercise This breed needs plenty of regular exercise.
Life Expectancy About 10 years
Grooming Pyrenees require regular brushing to keep their coats in good condition. Extra care is needed with the undercoat during shedding. Bathe only when necessary. This breed sheds heavily once per year.
Origin While the most recognizable and populous example of the flock-guarding breeds, the Pyr originated in the Pyrenees Mountains that separate France from Spain. They have been guarding the flocks in France for millennia. Fossils of the breed type have been found predating the Bronze Age (1800-1000 BC). Discovered by the French nobility before the Revolution, like the Maremma in Italy, they could be found guarding the large chateaux in southern France. Dauphin Louis XIV named the breed the Royal Dog of France. The early 20th century found these dogs nearly extinct. Bernard Senac-Lagrange, a French aristocrat and well-known dog authority, consolidated various factions, went into the mountains to obtain good specimens and created the first written standard.
Group Working