Dog food, cat food, pet vitamins, pet supplements, and all your pet supplies from the online pet supply leader.

Newfoundland

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Newfoundland

Newfoundland's have a water-repellent double coat, with the dense outer coat being flat, oily and slightly wavy and the undercoat being thick and oily. (Dogs who live indoors tend to lose their undercoat) There should be slight feathering on the back of the front legs. The desired colors are black, brown, gray and landseer, which is white with specific black markings. The head should be broad with a wide, square-shaped muzzle. The small eyes should be wide and deep set with a dark brown color. The small, pendant ears are triangular in shape and set well back on the head. The nose is black on all dogs except the one with a bronze-colored coat. These dogs have brown noses. Newfoundland's should have a soft mouth, well covered lips and a scissor-like bite. The neck should be muscular and well set onto the shoulders. The deep chest and back should be broad and the topline level. The strong forelegs should be straight and the hindlegs well-built. The large feet should be web-shaped and the dewclaws on the back legs should be removed. The moderately long tail is covered with hair and should slightly curve at the end. When the dog is in motion then the tail is somewhat raised.

Temperament Newfoundland's are generous, gentle, devoted and have a sweet temperament. They are patient with strangers and affectionate towards their owners making excellent family pets. They become extremely attached to their families and have a difficult time transitioning to a new home environment. They are an outgoing and friendly breed and generally good with other animals. Some males may be aggressive with other males. They are gentle and loving with children. Newfoundland's are protective, but instead of growling or barking will place their body between the threat and the family. This breed loves to swim; however, they may try to drag people out of the water due to their natural life-saving instincts. This breed also tends to drool.
Height, Weight Male Height: 27-29" ; Weight: 130-150 lbs.
Female Height: 25-27" ; Weight: 100-120 lbs.
Health Problems Newfoundland's are prone to hip dysplasia and hereditary heart disease.
Living Conditions Newfs can live okay in an apartment if they are given sufficient exercise. An average-sized yard is fine. They are sensitive to heat and need plenty of shade and water during warmer months. They prefer cooler climates.
Exercise A Newfoundland can lie around all day and become quite lazy. Regular moderate exercise is necessary to prevent this breed from becoming overweight. They should be allowed to run off their lead and to swim.
Life Expectancy About 9-15 years
Grooming This breed needs daily brushing because of their thick coat. The undercoat sheds twice a year. Only bathe when absolutely necessary. Use dry shampoo occasionally.
Origin The exact origin of the Newfoundland is unknown. However they are believed to be descendents of nomadic dogs or Viking "bear dogs" that were crossed with the Great Pyrenees and Tibetan Mastiffs. These breeds were brought to Canada in the 1700s by European fisherman. The result was the Newfoundland and was used by fisherman to haul in nets, carry boat lines to shore, rescue shipwreck and drowning victims and retrieving items that might have fallen overboard. In the early 18th century the Newfoundland became popular in Europe. Lord Byron even wrote about this breed: "... Courage without ferocity, and all the virtues of a man without his vices". The breed was especially helpful to those who couldn't afford horses. They used this breed to transport goods from ports to their homes. Soon after, several breeding kennels were opened throughout Europe. In 1886, the Newfoundland Club was established and a breed standard was formed. This breed is a talented water rescue dog and has been called the St. Bernard of the water. Their webbed feet and oily coat allows them to stay in water for long periods of time. In 1919, a Newfoundland was awarded a gold medal for pulling a lifeboat full of twenty shipwreck victims to safety. In World War II, this breed was also used to haul supplies for the military in Alaska and the Aleutian Islands during blizzard conditions. Newfoundland's are good at water trials, obedience, carting, and backpacking. They are recognized by the AKC and the UKC.
Group AKC Working, UKC Guardian Dog