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Norwegian Lundehund

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Norwegian Lundehund

The Norwegian Lundehund is an extremely physically unique breed. It has a double coat with a rough, dense outer coat and a soft undercoat. The coat color ranges from reddish-brown, fallow or white with black, grey or white markings. Mature dogs usually have more black markings on their coat. The deep-set eyes should be brown. The medium sized ears are erect and are placed high upon the head. The small, wedge-shaped head is connected to an extraordinarily flexible neck which can be bent backward along their spine and upside down. The ears are triangle-shaped and broad at the base. The ear lobes have the ability to retract themselves so that the ear folds either forward or backward in order to seal out water. The shoulder joints are also flexible. The legs are muscular with forelegs that can bend outward from their bodies, like humans. Norwegian Lundehunds have polydactyl toes, meaning they have more than the usual amount. The tail is carried over the back.

Temperament Norwegian Lundehunds are friendly, loving, and affectionate. They have strong den instincts and enjoy snuggling with people or other dogs. This breed is curious and will explore everything in their environment. This breed is excellent with children and do not mind having their ears or tails tugged on. They are slightly wary of strangers; however, they are friendly around other dogs. Norwegian Lundehunds are also protective of their families, although they are not an aggressive breed. This breed may sometimes resort to primitive hunting skills within the house. Training may be difficult as they can be independent and strong-minded. They are not to be trusted with small animals. Norwegian Lundehunds, once trained, make great agility dogs.
Height, Weight Height: 12-15" ; Weight: 13-16 lbs.
Health Problems Norwegian Lundehunds are fairly healthy although they are prone to Lundehund Syndrome, which is a disease of the intestinal tract which disallows the body to absorb nutrients from food. There is no cure for this disease but not all dogs are affected by it, and it can be managed.
Living Conditions The Lundehund is an adaptable breed and will do fine with apartment living as long as it gets enough exercise. A special diet may be necessary with this breed.
Exercise This breed needs plenty of exercise. A daily walk is a good source of exercise as well.
Life Expectancy Less than 12 years due to their frequency of being diagnosed with Lundehund Syndrome, which causes them to have a substantial reduction of their average life span.
Grooming The Lundehund is easy to groom. Brushing regularly will keep them neat as well as remove dead hair. They shed heavily twice a year.
Origin Named as the world's rarest canine breed, the Norwegian Lundehund originated from Vaerog and Rost in northern Norway. From the 1600s to the 1800s, this breed was used to hunt puffins along the Norwegian coast and was known as the Norwegian Puffin Dog. Puffins eventually became a protected species and illegal to hunt. This and a dog tax led to a significant decline in the breed's population. In the 1900s, the breed was found in the isolated village of Mostad in Lofoten, Norway. During World War II, the breed was almost eliminated with only 6 surviving dogs. Strict breeding guidelines were carefully established resulting in the 1500-2000 dogs in existence today. This breed is considered a National Treasure in Norway and has appeared on Norwegian postage stamps. The Norwegian Lundehund is recognized by the AKC, UKC and the FCI.
Group AKC Non-Sporting, UKC Northern