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Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever

The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever has a double coat with a straight, medium length outer-coat and a soft, dense undercoat. Feathering should be on the throat, back of the thighs and behind the ears. When showing this breed, the color preferences are all shades of red or orange, lighter with colored feathering underneath the body and tail. They may also have white markings on their feet, chest, face, and on the tip of their tail. The wide head is slightly rounded with a wedge-like appearance and the muzzle tapered. The almond-shaped eyes should be medium in size and be amber to brown in color. The eye rim color should be the same as the coat or dark. The nose and lips should match the eye rim. The triangular-shaped ears are set high and well back on the head. They should be medium in size and have rounded tips. The lips should be tight and the mouth soft but strong. The teeth should meet in a scissor-like bite. The well-muscled neck should be medium in length merging into a short back with a level topline. The chest should be deep and well insulated. The forelegs should be straight and parallel. The hindlegs should be well muscled with slightly sloping pasterns. The round feet are webbed with well-arched toes. The luxuriously feathered tail is carried below the topline while at rest. When active the tail is held high and curves over the back.

Temperament Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retrievers are a gentle, affectionate and loving breed. They enjoy being with their family and are patient with children. This breed, unlike other retrievers, tend to be reserved around strangers and will bark when they sense danger. The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever gets along well with other dogs and household animals. This breed can dominate the household if allowed so they should be socialized and trained from an early age. They are playful, love to swim and are naturally passionate about hunting.
Height, Weight Height: 17-21" ; Weight: 37-51 lbs.
Health Problems Minor concerns with this breed include thyroid and autoimmune problems and progressive retinal atrophy.
Living Conditions The Toller will do okay living in an apartment if they get enough exercise. They prefer colder climates.
Exercise This breed needs lots of daily exercise and should be allowed have lots of fun. They do well with retrieving.
Life Expectancy About 12-14 years
Grooming The topcoat and undercoat of this breed need to be combed and brushed daily. Bathe only when necessary so that you do not remove the natural oils in its coat that make it waterproof. This breed is an average shedder.
Origin This breed was originally developed during the 19th century, in the Little River District of Nova Scotia, Canada. They were initially called the Little River Dog (or the Yarmouth Toller) after their birthplace. The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever is believed to be developed from a cross between Golden, Chesapeake Bay, Labrador, and Flat Coated Retrievers. It is also thought that a small amount of Cocker Spaniel, Irish Setter, working Collies and a variety of Spitz were added as well. In the 20th century, their skills were honed to lure and retrieve waterfowl. In 1945, the breed was recognized by the Canadian Kennel Club and the breed's name was officially changed to Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever. This name was chosen from the method in which this breed lures ducks to the hunter. When "tolling" the dog runs and jumps along a shoreline full of ducks. The dog then disappears and reappears with a stick or balls, thus arousing the curiosity of the ducks and bringing them into gunshot range of the hunter. Once the shooting commences, the dog retrieves the ducks for their owner. The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was not well known until they won Best in Show at two Canadian Dog Shows. The breed became increasingly popular after these events. They were soon exporting the breed to countries such as the United Kingdom, the United States and Sweden. In 1988, this breed, along with three other Canadian dog breeds, were honored with their portraits on a postage stamp and in 1995 they became the official dog of Nova Scotia. The Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever was officially recognized by the UKC in 1987 and by the AKC in 2003.
Group AKC Sporting, UKC Gun Dog