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Scottish Deerhound

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Scottish Deerhound

The Scottish Deerhound is described as a rough-coated Greyhound, though he is much larger in size. This slim sight-hound has a long coat, mustache, beard and mane. The muzzle is pointed and the head is long. The hair on the skull should be long and softer than the rest of the coat. The coat comes in various shades of gray, fawn or brindle. A small amount of white is found on the chest, feet and tail. The ears are set high and folded back like a Greyhound's. The ears should be soft and glossy, like a mouse's coat to the touch. The teeth should meet at a scissor-like bite. The neck of this breed must be strong as it should be able to hold a stag. The eyes are dark brown, brown or hazel. A very light eye is not liked. The chest is deep and of good girth, and the topline is slightly curved. The feet are close and compact. The tail is long, covered with hair and reaches down to the ground. The tail is curved when in motion or excited.

Temperament The Deerhound has the gentle, quiet nature of most sight-hounds, silently curling up or tiptoeing around the house. But once outside, their urge to run will carry them great distances in a short period of time. They adore their family in a quiet, dignified manner. They make good pets but the cost of feeding and providing the necessary space will always keep the breed limited. They are excellent with children and just love everyone, making them poor watchdogs. They can be a bit willful and slow to obey commands. They are friendly with other dogs, but should not be trusted with non-canine pets. They have a very unusual cry.
Height, Weight Male Height: 28-32" ; Weight: 75-110 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is prone to bloat. Feed two or three small meals per day instead of a large meal. Make sure it rests after a large meal.
Living Conditions Deerhounds are not recommended for apartment living. They need a large yard.
Exercise This active breed needs regular exercise but do not let them off their lead as they are exceptionally fast and love to chase. They make excellent jogging companions.
Life Expectancy Less than 10 years
Grooming This breed needs to be extensively groomed. The harsh, wiry coat needs to be trimmed and stripped. They are average shedders.
Origin In the harsh environment of the Scottish Highlands, the early silken-skinned African Greyhounds were at a great disadvantage. They were probably crossed with shaggy native breeds to acquire weather protection. Beneath that wiry coat remains an almost classic Greyhound outline. It wasn't until the early 1800s that two brothers, Archibald and Duncan (Lord Colonsay) McNeill, undertook the task of reviving the great Scottish hound. Queen Victoria also became a patron. The breed was brought to North America during the Victorian resurrection of the late 1800s. The Scottish Deerhound is recognized by the AKC and the UKC.
Group AKC Hound, UKC Sighthound and Pariah Dog