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Tibetan Spaniel

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Tibetan Spaniel

The Tibetan Spaniel usually has long hair on the back of the legs and the shoulders with an overall short coat. Males typically have a heavier coat than females. All colors or mixture of colors are permissible, although the colors are usually gold, cream, fawn, red, white, black, and black-and-tan. The slightly domed head is small in proportion to the rest of the body. The stop is slight but defined and the muzzle medium in length. The pendant ears are medium in size and set high on the head. The oval-shaped eyes are usually dark brown, the nose black and the mouth slightly undershot. The strong neck should be moderately short and the length of the body should be longer than the height of the withers. The back is strong with well-sprung ribs. The shoulders are firm and the moderately boned legs slightly bow. The hindlegs have well let down hocks as well as a moderate stifle. The small, cat-like feet are round and have feathering between the toes. The high set tail is plumed and is carried over the back.

Temperament Tibetan Spaniels are intelligent, sweet, happy and trusting. They are very loyal and protective towards their families, especially the children. They are generally wary around strangers and will alert their families in case of intruders or strange noises. They usually get along with other household pets as long as they've been raised with them. This breed is fairly independent. They can also be insistent and willful on occasion.
Height, Weight Height: 10" ; Weight: 9-15 lbs.
Health Problems Though a very healthy breed, they are prone to overheat and have respiratory problems.
Living Conditions The Tibetan Spaniel is good for apartment living and will do fine without a yard.
Exercise This breed enjoys long walks and romps in the yard.
Life Expectancy About 12-15 years
Grooming This breed's hair comes out in clumps once a year. Brush regularly. They are average shedders.
Origin Tibetan Spaniels originated from monasteries and villages located in the Himalayan Mountains. Their love of lofty views and keen eye sight made this breed an excellent guard dog for these isolated areas. Tibetan Spaniels were highly regarded companions by the monks. During the winter months, they would place a dog under their robe, benefiting from each other's warmth. These dogs were also reportedly used to turn prayer wheels at the monasteries. Tibetan Spaniels were highly prized in ancient Tibet and often used as gifts to royal households. Due to this, the breed spread throughout Asia. Breeding was not discriminate at the time and many of the breed was crossed with Chin, Pekingese, and other Oriental breeds. A breed similar in appearance to the Tibetan Spaniel was found on Chinese bronzes, which would date the breed as far back as 1100 BC. The first record of the Tibetan Spaniel in England was in 1895, when a sailor returned from the Middle East with the breed. English breeders were slow to take interest and after World War I the breed was nearly extinct. It wasn't until Lady Wakefield received a Tibetan Spaniel as a present in India and bred it with an import from a Western Tibetan Tashi-Gong Monastery that a true program began. A litter was produced in 1941 and subsequently brought to England in 1946. The breed was officially recognized by the AKC in 1984 and by the UKC in 1992.
Group AKC Non-Sporting, UKC Companion Dog