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Weimaraner

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Weimaraner

Weimaraners are moderately large, athletic dogs with beautiful lines. There are two varieties of this breed: the short-haired and the long-haired. The latter is less common than the other and is not accepted in the United States. The coat is generally a shimmering, smooth gray coat with the head and ears being slightly lighter than the rest of the body. The moderately long head should be aristocratic with a prominent occiput and a moderate stop. The eyes are medium-sized and should be amber, blue-gray, or gray in color. The long, pendant ears should be set high on the head. The strong jaw has teeth that meet in a scissor-like bite. The flews should be moderately deep and the distinct neck moderately long. The well-developed body has a square shape to it. The chest is deep and the topline slopes gently towards the withers. The forelegs should be straight and strong with the dewclaws removed. The hindlegs should be slightly angled with well-turned stifles. The hocks should have well-developed muscles and be well let down. The feet are webbed with well-arched toes. The tail is normally docked.

Temperament Weimaraners are happy, rambunctious, brave, loving and loyal. They are a friendly breed but are ever-alert, making them excellent guard dogs. They enjoy family life and are generally kind to children. However, Weimaraners are not recommended for smaller children since they can be knocked over during the dogs' energetic, rowdy play. They do not do well in kennels and need a lot of attention. If they are left alone for long periods of time they can become destructive and restless. They are usually reserved with strangers and very protective of their territory. They can also be combative with other dogs if not socialized at an early age. If properly trained they can also get along with other household animals. They should not be trusted with small non-canine animals since they have a strong prey instinct.
Height, Weight Male Height: 24-27" ; Weight: 55-70 lbs.
Female Height: 22-25" ; Weight: 50-65 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is prone to bloat, hip dysplasia and tumors. Feed them two or three small meals each day instead of one big meal.
Living Conditions The Weimaraner will do okay living in an apartment. It does best with a large yard.
Exercise This powerful breed has lots of stamina and needs lots of regular exercise. They should not be allowed to exercise after they eat.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming This breed is easy to groom. Brush with a firm bristle brush and dry shampoo when necessary. Check the mouth and feet after strenuous activity. Keep the nails trimmed. They are average shedders.
Origin The exact origins of this breed are still unknown although they are believed to be descendants of a stock similar to the German Short-Haired Pointer, Bloodhound and crossed with one or more of the various schweisshund breeds. A dog of the Weimaraner type appeared in an early 1600s Van Dyke painting. The breed received their name from the nobles of the court of Charles August, Grand Duke of Weimar. They were used to hunt big game such as wolves, wildcats, deer, mountain lions and bears. In the late 1800s, big game disappeared from Europe and the Weimaraner became a rare breed. Over the years, with selective breeding, they became small game hunters and bird dogs. Their popularity once again increased. The breeding of the Weimaraner was kept top secret by the German breed club. It wasn't until 1929 when they were finally introduced to America by Howard Knight, a member of the Breed Society Club of Germany. Mr. Knight founded the United States breed club and the breed was officially recognized by the AKC in 1943 and by the UKC in 1955. Weimaraners have been used as rescue dogs, service dogs for the disabled and as police dogs in England and Germany.
Group AKC Sporting, UKC Gun Dog