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Welsh Terrier

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Welsh Terrier

Welsh Terriers are small, compact and rugged looking. They look very similar to Airedale Terriers. They have wiry, rough coats that are usually black/tan, black, tan or grizzle. Puppies are born black. The dogs with lighter coats will fade from black as they mature. The long head should be flat and rectangular in shape. The muzzle is squared at the end and the stop is undefined. They should have bushy eyebrows, a mustache and a beard. The small, well-set eyes should be dark and almond-shaped. The nose is black. The small, triangular-shaped ears sit fairly high on the head and fold forward. The teeth meet in a level or scissor-like bite although scissor is preferred when showing this breed. The slightly arched neck should be medium in length and thickness and merge into sloping shoulders. The short body has a level topline and the chest is well-ribbed. The muscular forelegs should be straight with ample bone and the hindlegs should be strong with ample bone and muscular thighs. The round feet are small and cat-like. The tail is generally docked. The front and back leg dewclaws should be removed.

Temperament Welsh Terriers are loving, curious, spunky, loyal, playful, energetic, and active dogs. They are also very affectionate dogs and bond closely with their families. However, they can sometimes be reserved with strangers. They are ideal with children and can handle their rough and tumble games. This breed gets along with cats and other small animals if introduced to them. If not, they will chase them. They enjoy and prefer being the only dog in the household. They are not an aggressive breed but they are brave and will be fearless if they have to. Some lines will be timid if touched unexpectedly. To prevent this, the breed must be socialized when young. They love to swim, dig and may be difficult to housebreak, especially a female.
Height, Weight Height: No more than 15" ; Weight: 20-21 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is prone to skin and eye problems.
Living Conditions The Welsh Terrier will do okay living in an apartment. A small yard is sufficient.
Exercise This breed is always ready for fun. They enjoy chasing balls and having the ability to run off their lead in an open and safe area. They are not fussy about how much they exercise.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming This breed needs to have their coat plucked several times a year. They also need to be brushed several times a week. Show dogs require much more attention. Keep the hair long at the feet, on the belly and around the face, giving him the appearance of a typical terrier. This breed sheds little or no hair.
Origin Welsh Terriers were developed in Carnarvonshire, Wales. In 1737 the residents prided themselves on having pure bred Welsh Terriers. For over two and a half centuries this breed was known by the name Carnarvonshire Welsh Terrier, due to its place of origin. However, though it is not confirmed, this breed was actually thought to be a descendant of the Old English Black and Tan (or the Broken-Coated Terrier). The breed was used in packs for hunting otters, foxes, and badgers. The breed was first shown in England in 1884 and was recognized as a separate breed in 1885. They were imported to America in 1888; however, they were still grouped with the Old English Terriers until 1901. They are recognized by the AKC and the UKC.
Group AKC and UKC Terrier