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Cimarron Uruguayo

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Cimarron Uruguayo

The Cimarron Uruguayo is also known as the Perro Criollo or the Perro Gaucho. The word "cimarron" means untamed or wild. The skull of this breed is wider than it is long and has a moderate stop. The muzzle is brown and powerful. The upper lips cover the lower lips. The teeth should meet in a scissor-like bite. The nose is broad and black and the almond-shaped eyes are any color of brown. The ears are medium-sized and triangular in shape; dropped, but do not hang close to the cheeks. The ears may be cropped in a rounded shape similar to a puma ear. The neck is strong and well-muscled. The chest is deep to the elbow and is broad with a well-developed forechest. The topline can be level or slightly saddle shaped. The thick tail is low set and reaches to the hock. It is carried low when the dog is at rest and horizontally or slightly upward when the dog is in motion. The short and smooth coat has an undercoat and comes in brindle and all shades of fawn with or without a mask or black shading.

Temperament The Cimarron Uruguayo is intelligent, courageous, strong and agile. This clever breed has a docile temperament, though only with its humans. They are aggressive towards strangers and intruders, but is calm around its human pack. They are superb guard dogs and a firmly loyal companion.
Height, Weight Male Height: 23-24" ; Weight: about 84-100 lbs.
Female Height: 21-23" ; Weight: 73-88 lbs.
Health Problems Hip dysplasia is a concern with most large breeds.
Living Conditions The Cimarron Uruguayo is a working breed and would do better living in the country or with a large yard.
Exercise This breed needs plenty of exercise to maintain their fitness level.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming The coat of this breed should be brushed regularly.
Origin The Cimarron Uruguayo is thought to be descended from dogs that were brought into Uruguay by the Spanish and Portuguese conquerors. The dogs that were left behind bred amongst themselves with only the fittest surviving. Eventually, the people in the region recognized that these dogs would make excellent guard, herding and hunting dogs. The Cimarron is the National Dog of Uruguay. This breed was recognized by the FCI and the UKC in 2006.
Group Guardian Breed