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Finnish Hound

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Finnish Hound

The Finnish Hound is a larger version of the Harrier. The head is well-defined and clean cut. The skull is lightly domed and the occipital peak is pronounced. They have a long muzzle and a well-developed nose. The eyes are dark and set straight ahead. The ears are set high, are medium in length and hang flat. The nose is usually black but can be self-colored according to the coat. The teeth meet in a scissor-bite. The neck is straight, thin and medium in length. The topline is level and the chest is deep and long. The tail is long, strong and tapers to a tip. The coat is moderately long, straight and stiff. Coat colors include black mantle with tan markings on the head, abdomen, shoulders, thighs and on the legs. There are usually white markings on the head, neck, chest, feet and the tip of the tail.

Temperament Finnish Hounds are friendly, calm and seldom aggressive; yet, during the hunt they are very energetic. This eager hunter is ready to hunt in difficult circumstances. This versatile tracker pursues his quarry with passionate barking. They love to explore, sniff and trial. Due to this, they should be kept on a leash or in a well fenced-in area.
Height, Weight Height: 20-24" ; Weight: 45-55 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is very hardy but occasionally can be prone to hip dysplasia.
Living Conditions It is not recommended to keep a Finnish Hound in an apartment. It is moderately active indoors and does best with at least an average-sized yard.
Exercise This breed needs daily vigorous exercise. They can become a nuisance if they do not get enough outdoor exercise. They make excellent jogging companions. Keep them on a leash as they may take off after an interesting scent.
Life Expectancy About 10-12 years
Grooming This breed is easy to groom with brushing and occasionally shampoos. They are average shedders.
Origin The breed was created by Tammelin, a Finnish metalsmith. He crossed German, Swiss, English and Scandinavian hounds. The Finnish Hound has become Finland's most popular native breed, but is seldom seen outside of the country. This breed is recognized by the UKC.
Group Hound