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Kishu Ken

The Canine Chronicles Directory

Kishu Ken

The Kishu Ken is a medium-sized, Spitz-type dog. The skull is broad with a slight furrow. The muzzle is fairly thick with a straight nasal bridge. The lips are dark and tightly closed. The teeth should meet in a scissor bite. The nose is usually black but can be flesh colored with the white coat. The small dark brown eyes are nearly triangular in shape. The ears are strong, erect and small. The neck is moderate, thick and muscular. The chest is deep and the legs are straight. The tail is thick and high set. It is usually curled over the back like a sickle. The outer coat of this breed is harsh, straight and may stand away from the body. The under coat is thick, soft and dense. White is the preferred color for the coat of the Kishu Ken, but may also come in red, sesame or brindle. Puppies usually resemble baby polar bears.

Temperament The Kishu Ken is courageous, brave as a hunter and very loyal to their owners. They get along great with other dogs as they are pack animals. They will do well with children as long as they are raised with them. This breed has a very strong prey drive; therefore, they do not do well in a household with smaller animals. They are gentle and devoted to their family, but are wary of strangers. This headstrong "leader of the pack" is best suited for one person.
Height, Weight Height: 17-22" ; Weight: 30-60 lbs.
Health Problems The Kishu Ken is a hardy breed due to isolation during their development.
Living Conditions The Kishu needs lots of room to roam and exercise. They will do best with a large yard or a fenced yard if in an urban setting. This wandering breed should be fenced and/or leashed any time they are outdoors. A suburban or rural environment is best for this breed.
Exercise This breed needs lots of regular exercise including long walks or a run in a secure area.
Life Expectancy About 11-13 years
Grooming The Kishu Ken should be brushed weekly to keep their coat clean and mat free. Only bathe when necessary. Check ears often for wax build-up, dirt or infection. Trim nails regularly. This breed sheds heavily twice a year.
Origin The Kishu Ken is an ancient Japanese breed that was originally developed as a hunting dog in the mountainous districts in Kishu. Because the province of Kishu was surrounded by mountains, the breed remained geographically isolated. They were a favorite of hunters who specialize in hunting deer and wild boar. This breed was designated a National Treasure in Japan in 1934. Today, this companion dog is relatively rare in both its native land and abroad. The Kishu is recognized by the UKC, the FCI and have been accepted for recording in the AKC Foundation Stock Service®.
Group AKC/FSS Working, UKC Northern