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American Bulldog

The Canine Chronicles Directory

American Bulldog

The American Bulldog is a well-muscled dog with a large head, deep chest, strong shoulders, solid neck and powerful legs. The neck may have a slight dewlap. The strong muzzle is box-shaped. The teeth should meet in a tight undershot or scissors bite. There are a variety of ear types including rose, pendant and half-pricked. Though some people crop the ears, uncropped ears are preferred in the breed standard. Any eye color is permitted, but black rims are preferred on white dogs. The nose is black or grizzle in color. The front legs should be strong and straight and the hindquarters, broad and muscular. The thick tail is low-set and tapers to a point. The short, harsh coat comes in a variety of colors including all shades of red, tan, brown and brindle.

Temperament The American Bulldog is a uniquely different breed from the American Staffordshire Terrier or the American Pit Bull Terrier. They are brave and determined, but not a hostile dog. This alert and confident breed genuinely loves children. They are known for their acts of heroism toward their master. These dogs have fought off bulls, wild dogs and fires; yet when called off by their handler, they immediately obey. This breed has strong protective instincts and should be well-socialized and obedience trained at an early age. Some may be aggressive with other dogs. They need to be around people to be truly happy. They tend to drool and slobber.
Height, Weight Male Height: 22-28" ; Weight: 70-120 lbs.
Female Height: 20-26" ; Weight: 60-100 lbs.
Health Problems This breed is prone to hip dysplasia.
Living Conditions This breed will do fine living in an apartment if it is sufficiently exercised. They do best with an average-sized yard.
Exercise This breed requires long daily walks.
Life Expectancy About 14-16 years
Grooming The short, harsh coat of this breed is easy to groom. Comb or brush regularly and bathe only when necessary. They are average shedders.
Origin American Bulldogs were originally working dogs who drove cattle and guarded their masters' property. At one time, this breed was used in the grueling sport of bull baiting. This sport was outlawed in England in 1835 and the original type of Bulldog disappeared from Britain and was replaced with a less athletic dog known as the English Bulldog. Immigrants who brought their working dogs with them to the American South were preserved. Thanks to the breeding programs of John D. Johnson and Allen Scott, the breed was brought back from the brink of extinction. The American Bulldog was recognized by the UKC in 1999.
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